Posts tagged 'Toolbars and Context Menus'

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Tip 4.41: You can customize the commands on the context menus

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



First, open the Tools–Customize menu. Now select the Toolbars tab, and check Context Menu.

Look up at the toolbar section of Visual Studio. Notice anything different? That's right: you are now looking at your context menus waiting for you to customize them, as shown here:



*This tip is deprecated in Visual Studio 2012.

Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:37 PM with 438 comments.

Monday, April 14, 2014

Tip 4.40: You can show shortcut keys in toolbar ToolTips

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Right-click anywhere on any toolbar or toolbar region to bring up the context menu, and then select Customize. In the lower left corner, check Show Shortcut Keys In ScreenTips. Now when you hover over a command, you'll see the keyboard shortcut in the ToolTip.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:22 PM with 3 comments.

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Tip 4.39: You can switch and swap buttons on the toolbars while the Tools–Customize dialog box is showing

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio" courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Sara Aside

This is one of her classic moments where she shouted, "Whoa, she never knew this!"


Go to the Tools–Customize dialog box. Note that this is a semi-modal dialog box (her made-up term, although there's probably a real term for it somewhere). A modal dialog box is where you can click only inside the dialog box. But some dialog boxes are modeless, where you can click outside the dialog box and focus remains outside. She calls the Tools–Customize dialog box semi-modal because you can interact only with the toolbar. Work with her here. Take your mouse and try to click and drag a button on any toolbar around here, there, and everywhere. Trust her, it will work, even if the Customize dialog box is open. Crazy, huh?



Note that you can even duplicate items by doing a Ctrl+Drag. The duplicate item can even live on a different toolbar! *This tip is deprecated in Visual Studio 2012

Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:31 PM with 459 comments.

Saturday, April 12, 2014

Tip 4.38: How to display any toolbar at any time

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Right-click anywhere on the toolbar area, either on a toolbar itself or in the unused portion of the toolbar space, to bring up the context menu of all available toolbars. Then select any toolbar from the list to have it appear.



Note that all the buttons may be disabled (as shown in the preceding picture) if you are not in the right environment context, meaning that you don't have the right window, editor, or designer showing to enable the buttons (which is why they were probably hidden to begin with). But play, experiment, and see if this helps.

Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 11:49 AM with 442 comments.

Friday, April 11, 2014

Tip 4.37: You can hide or show the default buttons from any toolbar

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Click the drop-down button on the menu, and select Add Or Remove Buttons. You'll be given a choice to either customize the buttons on the given tool window or to bring up the Tools–Customize dialog box. Select the current tool window to see a list of buttons to enable or disable.



Sometimes, there's no room to see all the available buttons. In that case, you'll see two right-pointing arrows above the drop-down button, as shown in the following image.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 1:18 PM with 466 comments.

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Tip 4.36: You can make a toolbar float

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



First, you'll want to hover the mouse over the grip control. You'll notice that the mouse control changes to a four-directional pointer.



Then hold the primary mouse button down and drag the toolbar around, as illustrated in the next screen shot.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:02 PM with 443 comments.

Wednesday, August 7, 2013

Tip 5.1: You can run Visual Studio commands from the Command Window

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Press Ctrl+Alt+A to open the Command Window, or go to View–Other Windows–Command Window. Now you can run various Visual Studio commands without having to go through the menus.

Examples of such commands include the following:
  • >File.Open c:\samples\myFile.txt Opens a file without going through the menu
  • >Help vs.commandwindow Opens a Help topic directly
  • >? i Returns the contents of the variable i
  • >? i = 10 Sets the contents of the variable i
For more commonly used commands that take arguments for Visual Studio 2012, check out the following documentation:http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/c338aexd(v=vs.110).aspx

Autocompletion is also provided for both the commands



and their corresponding arguments.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:54 PM with 680 comments.

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

Tip 4.41: You can customize the commands on the context menus

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



First, open the Tools–Customize menu. Now select the Toolbars tab, and check Context Menu. Look up at the toolbar section of Visual Studio. Notice anything different? That's right: you are now looking at your context menus waiting for you to customize them, as shown here:



*This tip is deprecated in Visual Studio 2012.

Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 1:01 PM with 437 comments.

Monday, August 5, 2013

Tip 4.40: You can show shortcut keys in toolbar ToolTips

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Right-click anywhere on any toolbar or toolbar region to bring up the context menu, and then select Customize. In the lower left corner, check Show Shortcut Keys In ScreenTips. Now when you hover over a command, you'll see the keyboard shortcut in the ToolTip.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 1:58 PM with 0 comments.

Sunday, August 4, 2013

Tip 4.39: You can switch and swap buttons on the toolbars while the Tools–Customize dialog box is showing

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio" courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Sara Aside

This is one of her classic moments where she shouted, "Whoa, she never knew this!"
Go to the Tools–Customize dialog box. Note that this is a semi-modal dialog box (her made-up term, although there's probably a real term for it somewhere). A modal dialog box is where you can click only inside the dialog box. But some dialog boxes are modeless, where you can click outside the dialog box and focus remains outside. She calls the Tools–Customize dialog box semi-modal because you can interact only with the toolbar.

Work with her here. Take your mouse and try to click and drag a button on any toolbar around here, there, and everywhere. Trust her, it will work, even if the Customize dialog box is open. Crazy, huh?



Note that you can even duplicate items by doing a Ctrl+Drag. The duplicate item can even live on a different toolbar! *This tip is deprecated in Visual Studio 2012

Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:18 PM with 435 comments.

Saturday, August 3, 2013

Tip 4.38: How to display any toolbar at any time

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog

Right-click anywhere on the toolbar area, either on a toolbar itself or in the unused portion of the toolbar space, to bring up the context menu of all available toolbars. Then select any toolbar from the list to have it appear.



Note that all the buttons may be disabled (as shown in the preceding picture) if you are not in the right environment context, meaning that you don't have the right window, editor, or designer showing to enable the buttons (which is why they were probably hidden to begin with).

But play, experiment, and see if this helps.

Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:55 PM with 0 comments.

Friday, August 2, 2013

Tip 4.37: You can hide or show the default buttons from any toolbar

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Click the drop-down button on the menu, and select Add Or Remove Buttons. You'll be given a choice to either customize the buttons on the given tool window or to bring up the Tools–Customize dialog box. Select the current tool window to see a list of buttons to enable or disable.



Sometimes, there's no room to see all the available buttons. In that case, you'll see two right-pointing arrows above the drop-down button, as shown in the following image.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 1:17 PM with 460 comments.

Thursday, August 1, 2013

Tip 4.36: You can make a toolbar float

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog

First, you'll want to hover the mouse over the grip control. You'll notice that the mouse control changes to a four-directional pointer.



Then hold the primary mouse button down and drag the toolbar around, as illustrated in the next screen shot.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 1:28 PM with 640 comments.