Posts tagged 'IntelliSense'

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Tip 2.37: How to turn off IntelliSense by default

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of Sara Ford

Sara Ford's Blog



Just in case you ever need to do this....

Go to Tools–Options–Text Editor–All Languages–General and uncheck Auto List Members and Parameter Information. If you just want to disable IntelliSense by default for a particular language, go to the Text Editor––General option page and set the behavior there.



Note that the IntelliSense commands themselves are not disabled, meaning you can still invoke IntelliSense via the keyboard shortcut or a toolbar button.

Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:45 PM with 432 comments.

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Tip 2.36: You can toggle between the Common and All Statement Completion tabs via the keyboard

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Once the statement completion dialog box is up, press Alt+. to move to the All tab and Alt+, to move to the Common tab.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:09 PM with 433 comments.

Monday, October 13, 2014

Tip 2.35: You can resize the statement completion dialog box

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



It's all about the simple things in life.

Yep, you can resize the statement completion dialog box from any direction.



A couple of things to note:
  • Max height is limited to one-third of the screen size.
  • Although width is resizable, only height is persisted.


Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:35 PM with 437 comments.

Sunday, October 12, 2014

Tip 2.34: How to increase the statement completion font size

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Go to Tools–Options–Environment–Fonts And Colors and set the Show Settings For option to Statement Completion. Now you can modify the font and font size.



This is the statement completion box at font size 12.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:13 PM with 441 comments.

Saturday, October 11, 2014

Tip 2.33: How to complete a word

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Whenever you can invoke statement completion, you can also execute the Edit.CompleteWord command. This command completes a word that is partially complete and that has no other possibilities. And if there are other multiple possibilities, the command invokes statement completion.

In the following example, since Console.WriteL has no possible matches other than Console. WriteLine, pressing Ctrl+Space or Alt+Right Arrow will write out WriteLine.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:27 PM with 693 comments.

Friday, October 10, 2014

Tip 2.32: How to display quick info for a function

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Type in a method name—for example, Console.Read—and then press Ctrl+K, Ctrl+I to invoke Quick Info on a function. The command is Edit.QuickInfo.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:53 PM with 447 comments.

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Tip 2.31: How to display parameter info for a function

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Press Ctrl+Shift+Space to display the parameter info. The command is Edit.ParameterInfo.



To iterate through the possible parameter choices, press the down arrow to go to the next function overload and press the up arrow to go to the previous function overload. For whatever reason, she always reverses these arrow keys and ends up navigating backward.

Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:58 PM with 594 comments.

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Tip 2.30: You can use Ctrl+J to invoke statement completion

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



The keyboard shortcut to invoke statement completion is Ctrl+J, which is bound to the command Edit.ListMembers.



In the Text Editor toolbar, you can invoke statement completion via the Show Member List icon.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:22 PM with 441 comments.

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Tip 2.37: How to turn off IntelliSense by default

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of Sara Ford

Sara Ford's Blog



Just in case you ever need to do this.... Go to Tools–Options–Text Editor–All Languages–General and uncheck Auto List Members and Parameter Information. If you just want to disable IntelliSense by default for a particular language, go to the Text Editor––General option page and set the behavior there.



Note that the IntelliSense commands themselves are not disabled, meaning you can still invoke IntelliSense via the keyboard shortcut or a toolbar button.

Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 1:42 PM with 445 comments.

Monday, February 3, 2014

Tip 2.36: You can toggle between the Common and All Statement Completion tabs via the keyboard

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Once the statement completion dialog box is up, press Alt+. to move to the All tab and Alt+, to move to the Common tab.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:35 PM with 444 comments.

Sunday, February 2, 2014

Tip 2.35: You can resize the statement completion dialog box

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



It's all about the simple things in life. Yep, you can resize the statement completion dialog box from any direction.



A couple of things to note:
  • Max height is limited to one-third of the screen size.
  • Although width is resizable, only height is persisted.


Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:58 PM with 447 comments.

Saturday, February 1, 2014

Tip 2.34: How to increase the statement completion font size

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Go to Tools–Options–Environment–Fonts And Colors and set the Show Settings For option to Statement Completion. Now you can modify the font and font size.



This is the statement completion box at font size 12.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 1:45 PM with 448 comments.

Friday, January 31, 2014

Tip 2.33: How to complete a word

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Whenever you can invoke statement completion, you can also execute the Edit.CompleteWord command. This command completes a word that is partially complete and that has no other possibilities. And if there are other multiple possibilities, the command invokes statement completion.

In the following example, since Console.WriteL has no possible matches other than Console. WriteLine, pressing Ctrl+Space or Alt+Right Arrow will write out WriteLine.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 11:58 AM with 481 comments.

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Tip 2.32: How to display quick info for a function

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Type in a method name—for example, Console.Read—and then press Ctrl+K, Ctrl+I to invoke Quick Info on a function. The command is Edit.QuickInfo.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 1:49 PM with 37 comments.

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Tip 2.31: How to display parameter info for a function

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Press Ctrl+Shift+Space to display the parameter info. The command is Edit.ParameterInfo.



To iterate through the possible parameter choices, press the down arrow to go to the next function overload and press the up arrow to go to the previous function overload. For whatever reason, she always reverses these arrow keys and ends up navigating backward.

Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:56 PM with 439 comments.

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Tip 2.30: You can use Ctrl+J to invoke statement completion

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



The keyboard shortcut to invoke statement completion is Ctrl+J, which is bound to the command Edit.ListMembers.



In the Text Editor toolbar, you can invoke statement completion via the Show Member List icon.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 1:45 PM with 511 comments.

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Tip 2.37: How to turn off IntelliSense by default

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of Sara Ford

Sara Ford's Blog



Just in case you ever need to do this.... Go to Tools–Options–Text Editor–All Languages–General and uncheck Auto List Members and Parameter Information. If you just want to disable IntelliSense by default for a particular language, go to the Text Editor––General option page and set the behavior there.



Note that the IntelliSense commands themselves are not disabled, meaning you can still invoke IntelliSense via the keyboard shortcut or a toolbar button.

Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 1:05 PM with 691 comments.

Monday, May 27, 2013

Tip 2.36: You can toggle between the Common and All Statement Completion tabs via the keyboard

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Once the statement completion dialog box is up, press Alt+. to move to the All tab and Alt+, to move to the Common tab.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 1:12 PM with 1178 comments.

Sunday, May 26, 2013

Tip 2.35: You can resize the statement completion dialog box

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



It's all about the simple things in life. Yep, you can resize the statement completion dialog box from any direction.



A couple of things to note:
  • Max height is limited to one-third of the screen size.
  • Although width is resizable, only height is persisted.


Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 11:58 AM with 438 comments.

Saturday, May 25, 2013

Tip 2.34: How to increase the statement completion font size

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Go to Tools–Options–Environment–Fonts And Colors and set the Show Settings For option to Statement Completion. Now you can modify the font and font size.



This is the statement completion box at font size 12.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:19 PM with 445 comments.

Friday, May 24, 2013

Tip 2.33: How to complete a word

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Whenever you can invoke statement completion, you can also execute the Edit.CompleteWord command. This command completes a word that is partially complete and that has no other possibilities. And if there are other multiple possibilities, the command invokes statement completion. In the following example, since Console.WriteL has no possible matches other than Console. WriteLine, pressing Ctrl+Space or Alt+Right Arrow will write out WriteLine.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:29 PM with 630 comments.

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Tip 2.32: How to display quick info for a function

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Type in a method name—for example, Console.Read—and then press Ctrl+K, Ctrl+I to invoke Quick Info on a function. The command is Edit.QuickInfo.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:31 PM with 916 comments.

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Tip 2.31: How to display parameter info for a function

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Press Ctrl+Shift+Space to display the parameter info. The command is Edit.ParameterInfo.



To iterate through the possible parameter choices, press the down arrow to go to the next function overload and press the up arrow to go to the previous function overload. For whatever reason, she always reverses these arrow keys and ends up navigating backward.

Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 1:06 PM with 443 comments.

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Tip 2.30: You can use Ctrl+J to invoke statement completion

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



The keyboard shortcut to invoke statement completion is Ctrl+J, which is bound to the command Edit.ListMembers.



In the Text Editor toolbar, you can invoke statement completion via the Show Member List icon.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 1:31 PM with 492 comments.