Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Tip 5.23: You can create new Toolbox tabs

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog

You can create your own Toolbox tabs to store practically whatever you want in them. For that upcoming presentation, you can create your own tab by choosing the Add tab on the Toolbox context menu and adding content by using either the mouse or keyboard to populate content into your new tab. (Yes, the keyboard works too for cutting and pasting code from the editor into the Toolbox.)

VSTip5230

Sara Aside

She was going to create another tip called "Did you know you can move tabs?" but it doesn't really stand on its own as a separate tip. As she's writing this, she still has three hours of battery life left for her plane flight, and the plane attendant people (she can't spell what they are called, and her row-seat neighbors are tired of playing human dictionary for her) just served brownies.
You can drag and drop Toolbox tabs to new locations in the list, and their location will persist.

VSTip5230a

Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 12:27 PM with 2545 comments.

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Tip 5.22: You can use Ctrl+C to copy controls in a Toolbox tab and then use Ctrl+V to paste the controls into another Toolbox tab

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



You can use the mouse to drag and drop controls to a new tab, and you can even use Ctrl+Drag to copy controls to a new tab. But did you know you can use the keyboard to achieve the same functionality? Use the classic Ctrl+C to copy any Toolbox control, and use the classic Ctrl+V to paste into the desired tab location.

VSTip5220

Note how the preceding image illustrates having both code and a button control within the General tab. Also note that she has the Show All option enabled to show the disabled code because when she took this screen shot, the WinForms designer was the active document in the IDE.

Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 11:42 AM with 924 comments.

Monday, August 26, 2013

Tip 5.21: You can use Show All to find your hiding Toolbox controls

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Sara Aside



This tip comes directly from the developer who works on the Toolbox. He toldĀ her her sees a lot of questions where people are trying to figure out why a particular control isn't there, especially when they've just recently added controls.


What happens is that all the controls in the Toolbox are managed by the active designer. A designer is like an editor because it takes up the same region of space in the IDE, but it allows you to design UI rather than write code. You can recognize a designer by the [Design] in the file tab. So, if the currently active designer doesn't support a particular control, you won't see it when you add it to the Toolbox.

VSTip5210

By choosing Show All, you can at least verify that your control was added. Now, how to get it active depends on the control and which designer is needed. In the next screen shot, notice the scroll bar position on the right, showing just how many controls are now visible.

VSTip5210a

Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 11:19 AM with 437 comments.