Sunday, March 31, 2013

Tip 1.15: You can hide the vertical and horizontal scroll bars in the editor

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



This tip truly embraces the spirit of "Did you know?" Go to Tools–Options–Text Editor–General, and under Display, you can uncheck the Vertical Scroll Bar and the Horizontal Scroll Bar options.



Now your scroll bars are hiding from you. And yes, you can still scroll both vertically and horizontally in this state.



Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 1:27 PM with 515 comments.

Saturday, March 30, 2013

Tip 1.14: How to jump to the top or bottom of the current view in the editor without scrolling

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Unlike pressing PgUp or PgDn, which causes the editor to move either up or down a page, the following keyboard shortcuts cause only the cursor to move:
  • Ctrl+PgUp jumps the cursor to the top of the current editor view without moving the current view, unlike a PgUp.

  • Ctrl+PgDn jumps the cursor to the bottom of the current editor view without moving the current view, unlike a PgDn.



If you find yourself using the keyboard shortcuts just shown, you may find these additional shortcuts helpful:
  • Ctrl+Shift+PgUp selects all the text between the current cursor location (near the bottom of the screen in the following illustration) and the top of the current editor view.

  • Ctrl+Shift+PgDn selects all the text between the current cursor location and the bottom of the current editor view.



One thing to note is that all four commands jump the cursor straight up, meaning that it doesn't go to the beginning of the line on that top line, but rather it goes as close as possible to the current column position, as you saw in the preceding illustrations.

Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 2:03 PM with 738 comments.

Friday, March 29, 2013

Tip 1.13: How to use the mouse wheel for scrolling in all directions

"Visual Studio Tips, 251 ways to improve your Productivity in Visual Studio", courtesy of 'Sara Ford'

Sara Ford's Blog



Did you know that you can press down on the mouse wheel and have it act as a third button? For many applications that have an editor, pressing the mouse wheel displays an icon indicating which directions you can scroll in. Some require holding down the mouse wheel; others don't. In the editor, press the mouse wheel just once and you'll see an icon indicating which directions you can scroll in.



A couple of things to note:
  • The farther away the mouse is from the directional icon, the faster the editor will scroll.
  • Pressing the primary mouse button stops the scroll, but you have to press the button again to move the cursor to the desired location.


Happy Programming! =)
Posted by Nils-Holger at 2:39 PM with 446 comments.